2020 MAYHEM CAPTAINS APLICANTS

Jaimee Gammon
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: I captained two seasons of track and one season of softball in high school. I was previously a corrections officer. I have been a mentor for the mayhem for the past two years. I’ve also coached to seasons of football for 6-7 year olds.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: When I was a corrections officer I had to take charge of many stressful situations to keep myself safe and the prisoners. One example where I had to take charge of a situation was when a prisoner pushed me while I was in a pod alone with her. I simply stood up in a calm and collected manner and turned on my body camera. I didn’t have to touch her or direct her. I radioed to the other people in the unit and the situation was over within a few minutes. I stayed calm and didn’t get upset because I knew it would only escalate the situation. The girl calmed down after a chat and apologized and the situation was over.
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: I feel my best leadership quality is that I always put the team first. I am at every practice, event, game, or gathering. I make my work schedules work for the Mayhem schedule and I am happy doing it because I have a true passion for the sport and my team.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: I feel that I need to improve on is having more confidence in myself. I plan on improving my confidence by finding the strengths I have as a leader and stepping up to the challenge.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: If I was a captain of the Maine Mayhem I would set a good example of a teammate and player for the team: I would be at every practice and game, I would be welcoming to every player and have a good attitude towards the team. Being a captain means a lot to me and I would take a lot of pride in the title. I would love to lead this team to playoffs and a championship.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: I captained my high school track team my junior and senior year. I also captained my junior year in softball. I contributed to my teams by being at every single practice, leading warm ups, setting a good example as a player and teammate, and by organizing team events.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: I got into women’s football when I was 18. Alicia Jeffords asked me if I wanted to play and I was hooked ever since. This season will be my fifth season. I had a great captain in high school field hockey. I started playing field hockey for the first time my junior year in high school and knew nothing about the sport. If it wasn’t for my captains in field hockey teaching me and making me feel welcomed, I would not have been in a starting position by my senior year.

Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: I am a lead at work as a Medical Assistant for 4 years, I have also been the head coach of Gorham Youth Football 3/4 grade tackle team for several years. I have been the Team captain on football teams, softball teams, as well as various other jobs throughout my life.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: I have been put in a lot of “take charge” situations, but one that seems to be most prevalent was when I was the head coach of the Gorham Youth Football team. Youth sports are tough sometimes, people are passionate about their kids playing, and tensions sometimes run higher than expected because of it. At one of our games, a parent of a child on my team was upset that the other team was seemingly “cheating” and they were yelling at the other team from my sidelines. Because of this, the ref’s were getting upset and were about to throw a penalty flag on me, because I am the head coach and I am expected to have control over my sidelines. Other parents started to pipe up and began yelling, before I even knew what was happening and things were getting slightly out of control, so i called a time out. I approached my sidelines in a calm and collected manner, and I told everyone in my ” I’ve got this” tone and assured everyone that I was going to handle this the best I can. I then approached the parent who was upset, and they began yelling at me that the other team was cheating and that one of their kids was purposefully throwing his son down by his facemask and “getting away with it”. I gently asked the parent to stop yelling so that I could really focus on what the concern was. He calmed down and said “J-Lo that kid is throwing Joey down every play, by his face mask and the refs aren’t even calling it!” I listened carefully to make sure that I didn’t misunderstand any part of his concern. I nodded and explained to him that it was difficult because there were only 2 refs on the field, and 2 coaches, and I apologized for not seeing it. I assured him that I would speak to the refs and the other teams coach to ensure his sons safety, but that it wasn’t ok for him to be yelling at the other team, and that if he couldn’t keep his cool then he would have to step outside the gate, because I was the one who would get in trouble for his outrage. He apologized for losing it, and I called for a quick meeting between the refs and the oppsoing coach. I explained the situation ( in which the other coach was super defensive about) but I just reminded everyone that we were there for the kids, and we wanted to make sure they were all learning the correct fundementals, and having fun at the same time; that their safety was the first priority. The opposing head coach and I shook hands and the game continued. As a result of taking charge of the situation, I gained the respect of the opposing coaches and refs, I maintained the trust of the parents that I was still there to stand up for them and their kids, and no one got ejected from the 3/4 grade game. If I hadn’t have taken charge, and tried to pass it to one of my assistants.. I feel like I wouldn’t have the respect or trust that is necessary to be considered a leader.
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: I think Self- Confidence is probably my best leadership skill. I am not just confident in my skill level, but I am also self- confident to know when I need to ask for help, or clarification. I am not afraid to make mistakes, I am not afraid to admit that I have made a mistake and I am never afraid to learn from my mistakes.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: There is always room for me to improve, on all levels of leadership, but one thing that always seems to be my achilles heel is being emotionally disciplined. Football is my life, it has been my passion for longer than I can remember; because of this, I sometimes get emotional… overly emotional. I don’t get down on my teammates when things aren’t going right, and I’ll never blame them for my performance, I get down on myself…I get frustrated that I can’t make myself perform the way i think i should, and I wear my heart on my sleeve. Football is always going to have it’s ups and downs, I am always going to have my good days and my bad days, and as a natural born leader I have to try my hardest to be more aware of how my emotions affect those around me. The only way for me to improve on this struggle is for me to get out of my own head, and remember that my attitude will directly affect those who look to me for guidance. I have to remind myself that you never know who is watching you, and you never know who considers you their “hero”. I WILL continue to work on being more cognitive of my teammates, and not just learn from my mistakes, but forgive myself for them too.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I think I would bring a different level of compassion, understanding and knowledge to the team. I know that sometimes people think that I am intimidating, or that maybe I think I am better than them… But I PROMISE you that I do not think I am BETTER than ANYONE! I know that I have my strengths and my weaknesses- both athletically and socially, and I am well aware that I have an amazing “resting bitch face” but, that resting bitch face is actually my ” take it all in and try to sort it all out” face. After playing this sport for 29 years, I have been on every aspect of the “football spectrum.” I was a rookie once- I didn’t know my left from my right half the time and I looked up to my mentors around me for guidance. I have been a veteran and a Team captain before, I’ve started every game both on offense and defense, and i’ve stood on the sidelines as a veteran player and didn’t even a min of playing time… because of this dynamic, I feel like I have a humbled outlook on this sport. I feel like my experiences on and off the field only enhance my leadership style. I tend to try to lead a little more by example, with bursts of the vocal yelling and encouragement- which is important, but I also feel like I can relate to a lot of my teammates on a different level. I’ve never been one to fit in a clique and i always strive to be open, and honest, and respect EVERYONE the way any human being deserves respect. I think that being able to relate to my teammates on all levels of the TEAM atmosphere is super important.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: yes I was a team captain for many years for the Maine Freeze, and the Rebels. Like I said above, I was able to relate to my teammates, and they respected me for it. They were able to approach me if they had a question or a concern and knew that I wasn’t going to just blow them off, or make them feel like an idiot for asking their questions. They knew that if they needed anything on or off the field that I was there for them, and if they had a question that I didn’t know the answer too they knew that I wouldn’t be afraid to admit it. They also knew that even though I was a captain, if I messed up- they could come to me and tell me I messed up and I wasn’t going to bite their heads off OR deny that i messed up. They knew that i would listen to them and take their criticism and learn from it, because ultimately especially in this sport- you can never learn enough… and when you stop learning- you probably should just stop playing.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: I started playing football when I was 8- I played through and finished Highschool senior varsity football for GHS in 2002… I heard about the Maine Freeze- and I knew I had to play. So I started playing in 2002 ( before I even graduated HS- so literally HS ball AND Womens ball at the same time; talk about a lot of football lol) There was no doubt at that point in my mind that we were on to something amazing with the whole womens football movement, and I wanted to see where it was going, and I felt like I was making a positive impact on history. In 2002 we played a team called the Mass Mutiny… and on that team was a girl named Jennifer Welter. Jen and I smacked heads that year many MANY times and after every hit I gave her she would get up with a smile and nod at me. At the after party’s her and I would chat and reminisce about the game we just played, and we would talk about our goals for women’s football in coming years. It always felt crazy to me to be talking to my opponent at the bar after like we were best buddies, but even crazier because Jen always seemed “out of this world” good, and I put her on a pedestal because she motivated me to be a better athlete. Today you might know Jen Welter as the first female coach in the NFL for her coaching postion on the Arizona Cardinals… which is inspiration all in of itself… but a few years back Jen and I reconnected at one of her girls flag football camps she runs. She hugged me like we were old pals and asked me how things were on the womens football front. We got to talking about how I envied her when I played against her and she said ” J… That’s crazy talk! I used to look up to you and you were on the other team! The way you would run through the holes, fearless… that’s what it was about you that made you great. You need to start owning your impact: you are the most powerful influencer you know… You already show that your confident even if on the inside you are scared shitless, now you just gotta own it!” I am not sure if she would believe me if i told her that the words she spoke pretty much saved my life. Because of her I know that I am capable of leading an army to battle and that I will do it with confidence and poise because that’s who I am and I can own that. Even if I am not chosen as a captain for this team… I will continue to display all the positive attributes that one looks for.. because I was just simply born to lead- and I don’t necessarily need the title to prove it.
Ally Cleveland
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: Most challenging > Parent and step-parent (26 years-current)
Middle School Classroom Teacher (6 years-current)
Football Coaching History
2016 Head Coach Maranacook HS Called O, D, Specials 0-8
2015 JV Coach Maranacook HS Defensive Coordinator/O-Line 5-3
2014 JV Coach Maranacook HS Defensive Coordinator/O-Line 4-4
2013 Asst. Coach Madison HS Varsity Defensive Coordinator/O-Line 2-6
2012 Head Coach Messalonskee Freshman Offense, Defense, Special Teams 4-4
2011 Asst. Coach Messalonskee HS Varsity Offensive Line/Linebackers 6-4
2011 Head Coach Messalonskee Youth 5/6 Offense, Defense, Special Teams 2-4
2010 Asst. Coach Messalonskee HS Varsity Offensive Line/Defensive Ends 5-4
2009 Asst. Coach Messalonskee HS Varsity Offensive Line/Defensive Ends 6-4
2009 Head Coach Messalonskee Freshman Offense, Defense, Special Teams 3-5
2008 Head Coach Messalonskee MS – 8th Offense, Defense, Special Teams 3-5
2007 Head Coach Messalonskee MS – 8th Offense, Defense, Special Teams 4-4
2007 Head Coach N.E. Football League Kennebec Valley Tigers, Semipro 7-1
2007 New England Football League “A” North All-Star Team Head Coach
2006 Asst. Coach Messalonskee MS – 8th Defensive Coordinator 4-4
2005 Asst. Coach Messalonskee MS – 8th Defensive Coordinator 2-6
2001 Head Coach Eastern Football League Central Maine Storm 2-7
Lacrosse Coaching History
2015 JV Coach Maranacook/Winthrop
2014 JV Coach Maranacook/Winthrop
2014 Asst. Coach Messalonskee 7th/8th Defenders 11-0
Fitness Coaching
2007-2014 Owner/Operator and Head Trainer CrossFit Central Maine at Littlefields Gym
Miscellaneous
Chair – Building Committee Belgrade Recreation Center for All Seasons
Chair – Board of Directors – Belgrade Regional Health Center 2003-2005
Chair – Building Committee – Belgrade Regional Health Center 2003
Secretary – Board of Directors – Androscoggin Fallen Angels Roller Derby League 2019-present
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: In 2007 I was the head coach for the North in the NE football league “A” division all-star game. Like many all-star games, it was dominated by defense. We got the ball back with 4 minutes left at our 40 and the score at 0-0. We drove the field with good use of time outs and all run plays except one screen play. On third down we were stopped at the one after having first and goal at the nine. There were about 20 seconds left on the clock.
As we were an all-star team, we had a kicker who had done nothing all day but one kick-off. I called my final time out, asked him if he wanted to take a shot at winning the game. He said, “ABSOLUTELY, It’s a chip shot!” I jogged out to the huddle and told them I was sending the kicker in to win it for us. I’m surprised the three linemen from my team let me live. They were furious. They’d gotten us down there and wanted the chance to pound it in from the one. I told them they had three chances from the nine and we were kicking the field goal.
In my mind, this was about doing the right thing. I gave the kid from Old Orchard the shot on a high percentage kick. He had been “money” in practice and he’d shown me the confidence I was looking for when I asked him if he could get it done. I made a decision that, to this day, I believe was the right decision that gave my team the best chance to win the game and at the same time honored the intention of an all-star game.
Of course, he shanked it right; the linemen tossed their helmets at the sideline, and I was the “zero”. After we stopped the next play and the game was over, I gave the team a minute to blow off steam and brought them together for a quick talk about the lessons of life and how things don’t always go our way. I really am surprised my tires weren’t slashed and I made it home alive!
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: I’m good at inspiring people to be their best – both leading by example and by taking the time to build relationships that fuel bonds amongst my teammates. I stay away from the drama and focus on the game. I find joy in the game.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: The thing I need to most improve on is not over-committing to things I can’t follow through on. I have been consciously NOT signing up for everything that needs doing. I want to focus on bringing in other people into situations where they can contribute and to lead by organizing others to get things done rather than trying to do everything myself.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: Experience – This will be my 50th year being involved in football in one capacity or another. That depth and breadth of experience allows me to roll with the changes of the season, offer mentoring to teammates and contribute on a meaningful way both on the field and in preparation with the coaching staff. The experience also creates opportunities on the playing field as I’ve “seen it all” at one time or another.
Enthusiasm and Positivity – This game requires both of these qualities in spades. I tend to be a “glass nearly full” person and work hard to spread that love of the game and to “fill people’s emotional tanks” as we go through a practice or a game or a season.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: I’ve been a captain on many football teams over the years. I contribute by being a constant and consistent force for holding the team and myself to high standards. I show up consistently and do the work. I’m not the fastest, not the most skilled and definitely not one who likes the limelight. I’ll hand the ball to the official when I score a touchdown. I play because I have an enormous love of, and respect for this game and the lessons it’s taught me. I think my biggest contribution to the teams I’ve captained has been to keep that LOVE and RESPECT in the equation and in the forefront of everything we do.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: Alicia and Coach Oja gave me a chance last year when I learned very late in the year about the team. I was at a place in my life where I could play, and they welcomed me into the family. This will be my second year. My positive experience to discuss is my relationship with Carl Rudman, my Head Coach for 3 years from 1998-2000. Carl was a calm, passionate coach. He had learned to coach from his dad, a legendary coach at Madison HS. Carl had a system he believed in and adjusted it according to the talent he had on our team each year. He became a life-long friend and taught me that it was OK to use the word “love” on the field and in the locker room. We won 3 consecutive State Championship in the Maine State Football League and always got our asses kicked when we went to the Harvest Bowl to play the teams from Massachusetts. It didn’t matter, we were playing the game we loved for a coach we believed in. Hell yes, Coach Rudman would get after us if we weren’t giving 100%, but we always knew it was because he wanted us to be and give our best. His quote was, “Focus on excellence in everything you do. It’s on that road to excellence you’ll find the wins you’re looking for.”

It’s that attitude that I bring to the team, whether I’m a captain or not.

Haylee Graves
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A :I am currently a physical therapist at St Mary’s D’Youville Pavilion. My job is to evaluate medically complex people, develop appropriate plans of care, and disseminate the information to other disciplines including occupational therapy, speech therapy, nurses, doctors, and physical therapist assistants. I have to coordinate with all these disciplines on a day to day basis to ensure my patient is making progress, receiving the care they require, and ensure safety once they are discharged from the facility.
My leadership role is exemplified by being responsible for how the physical therapist assistants (PTAs) carry out the plans of care or treatments I have developed. At any one time I can be responsible for four PTAs treating the caseload I have evaluated. I frequently discuss with my PTAs how patients are progressing what areas they are doing well in or what areas they need to improve in, then provide any suggestions I have for treatment options. I make it a point to frequently discuss with each PTA about individual patients to maximize their function and share this information with other disciplines to provide complete care to the patients.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: As a physical therapist, my job is to reduce the risk of injury or reinjury in the patients I work with. While discussing reduced time with training and increased injury risk with members of the team, the topic of an off-season and preseason training manual arouse. I took it upon myself to develop a training manual that was easy to use, able to be completed at home or with minimal gym equipment, was easily accessible for people of all training levels, and mirrored exercises we complete as part of Train Maine.
I conducted myself by completing research for sports specific exercises, developing training sessions for various levels of fitness and ability, providing education in regards to the benefits of each component, and having multiple peers review the manual before final approval and completion. As a result, the manual has been in place and utilized for three seasons, with this year being the fourth season.
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: My best leadership quality is my discipline with leading by example. I feel I lead the best when I am on the field and in pads. I feel that practicing what you preach is important, and the discipline with little details is vital. I value things such as getting to practice on early, jogging to each station between drills, giving 100% during each drill, and coaching up and answering questions when there is confusion. I set the bar high for myself and attempt to embody that through how I carry myself on the field.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: One leadership area I feel I lack in is I am not a very local leader on game day. I do not find myself often getting “hype” before games. I tend to focus on my job on the field and remain more reserved. What I would like to do differently is increase my vocal presence not only on game days, but also during practices. I would like to continue cheering players on during drills, clapping players on, and vocalizing my support to other players.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I can positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain by continuing to be a leader on and off the field. I can continue to answer rookie questions, and continue to help coach players up during practices and during games. I can continue to discuss game plans with coaches and exchange information with coaches during practices and games to help adjust the game plans as needed. I can also contribute by having a positive attitude and positive conduct with players coaches, staff, and other teams during our athletic contests.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: I have previously been selected by my peers as a captain for the Maine Mayhem for the following seasons: 2017, 2018, and 2019. My greatest opportunity to contribute as a captain occurred during our last season. Late in December 2018, I suffered a broken finger which required surgical repair and an eight week course of no sports and no work which provided me a unique opportunity to lead in an off-field position.
I continued to attend every practice and Train Maine session. During practices I had the opportunity to work with rookies one-on-one. I was given the chance to teach a rookie the position I play on defense and answer all their questions live during practice. I would also take videos or pictures during practice and review after plays with the rookies. I found it was also good moral to be able to send people pictures and photos of practice. This was a humbling experience as I was unable to participate at the capacity I wanted to during the majority of the preseason.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: My first experience with football began outside of women’s football. After an extended period of being unable to play sports as a child due to a childhood illness, I was introduced to football when my Mom asked my brother if he wanted to play. I asked if I could play too. It really was that simple. I played youth football from 5th grade through 8th grade in what is now known as the Brunswick Area Youth Football League (BAYFL). I also played on the freshman team at Brunswick High School. I was always the “only girl” who played on the teams. It was very rare at the time for a girl to play on the “all boys teams.” My football career with BAYFL did not end there. During my senior year of high school, I was a volunteer assistant defensive coach for the 8th grade team. Also, in 2018 and 2019, I became NFHS certified referee who qualifies to officiate at the grade school, middle school, and high school level football.
Once I entered college I told my Mom “I miss sports.” I told her I missed football the most as this was my favorite sport. She happened to stumble upon the Maine Rebels. We looked into the information in regards to the team tryouts and season. The rest is history. I played on the Maine Rebels three seasons and have played on the Maine Mayhem for four seasons, with this upcoming season being my fifth season with the team. In total, I have played 12 years of football: five years at youth level and seven years on a women’s football team. During my time as a professional women’s football player, I have been selected as an All-Star or All-American five times and the last two seasons I have been selected as a Defensive Player of the Year.
A positive interaction I have had from a leader was with my middle school football coach. This was a positive experience because he gave me the opportunity to prove my abilities to compete on the field with “the boys” and earn a starting position on the team. My coach valued how hard we worked on the field, and how working hard can help you be successful and achieve your goals. This interaction leads me to believe hard work on and off the field is important and is something I intend to do on and off the field as a leader.

 

Maggie Schofield
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: Caption of my high school basketball team, Coached JV basketball, Vice President of my class throughout high school.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: When I was a sophomore in high school, I watched a guy on a bike get backed over by a car. I called 911 while everyone huddled around him not knowing what to do.
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: Tie between inclusivity and commitment. I do my best to always make sure everyone feels welcome and a part of the team while also encourage and cheering them all on. And when it comes to commitment, I’m 99% of the time going to show up, whether I’m needed or not I’m going to be there.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: Confidence. For me confidence comes with knowledge so the more I study and practice, the more confident I’ll become. And just because I lack confidence doesn’t mean I can’t bestow it on my teammates.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I’ll always be there for my teammates, I’ll make sure everyone feels like they’re needed and that they’ve earned there spot and deserve to be there.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: When I was captain of my basketball team, my teammates were rather different. We didn’t have a lot in common besides liking basketball. We struggled in the start of the season but it was because we weren’t working as a unit. My co-captain and I planned team dinners to make sure we all new each other on a level further then on the court. By the end of the season one of my teammates said she had been playing basketball for as long as she could remember but had never actually felt like a part of the team until that year.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: I missed playing a sport after high school. I found a local flag football league and played that for a couple years and last season was my first on the Mayhem. I’ve looked up to a lot of people throughout my sports career. I feel the ones that have made the most lasting impact on me were the ones who wanted nothing but the best for their team. They put their teammates and team first and their own personal wants and needs second. Their mindset has definitely made an impression on me and I’m able to bring that to the team.
Katie McFadden
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: Other than previous captain experience, I am the founder and head of the Players Advisory Committee (PAC) and I am on the Board of Directors. I have also had leadership roles in my professional life (Head Athletic Trainer, Shift Leader, and Manager).
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: Following the 2019 Mayhem season I was unhappy with the team culture and vibe over all. I had heard feedback from several players who felt the same way and were unsure about returning to the team unless there were some changes made. After taking some time to reflect on the season and letting my emotions settle I scheduled a meeting with Alicia and Coach Oja to propose the Players Advisory Committee (PAC). My vision was to make positive changes in the team based on what the team felt was important to them, I wanted everyone to feel valued and heard. I then planned, scheduled and held 2 successful PAC meetings with specific goals outlined to the group. I then presented the information to Alicia ad Coach Oja and then finally the Board of Directors to elicit some positive change. There are some changes that have already been put it place such as the process by which we will be selecting captains and hopefully there will be many more to come as the season progresses.
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: I feel that my best leadership qualities are passion and confidence. Football is one of the things I am most passionate about in life and I hope to motivate and inspire the same passion in all of my teammates. I feel that it is important to have that little bit of swagger and assertiveness in this sport. I am not a very confident person in my daily life but when I step on the football field and look at my opponent my mindset is “go ahead and try”.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: In my everyday life as well as in football I need to work on my patience. I also need to work on expressing my passion and intensity in a way that is perceived as it is intended, motivational, supportive, and helpful. I understand that everyone receives intensity and “hype” differently. I respect each and every one of my teammates and I am going to make an honest effort to support, help, and motivate each of them in a way that feels good for them.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I hope to lead by example and from experience. In my 8 season of playing football I have played for several different coaches with tons of different athletes and on several different teams. I have been through a team folding, a team losing its funding, and a team going through an ownership change. I have been a new rookie, a second year rookie on a new team, a returning player, a veteran player, and a 6 year rookie on a new team. I have gone through seasons playing every single snap and I have gone through seasons not playing in a single game. I have had seasons where we didn’t have a hope at playoffs and I have played in two and won a Division I National Championship. I have had season ending injuries and I have made lifelong friendships. My experience with this sport goes so much deeper than Xs and Os and I hope to have the honor of sharing my knowledge and passion with this team and helping to lead the Mayhem in pursuit of our vision and goals.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: I was a captain on 8 of the 11 varsity teams I played on in high school (cheerleading, track, and softball).
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: After college I was an intern at Phillips Exeter Academy and one of my good friends at the Academy said she had heard NH had a women’s football team and we should go check it out. We went to the NH Freedom tryouts, she lasted about a week and I have been playing ever since!! This season is my 9th season playing!! One really positive interaction I had with a leader was in my rookie season playing for the Boston Militia at a team after party in our team hotel I was approached by captain and quarterback Allison Cahill. If you know much about football/ have met Al this is a big deal!! I had all I could do not to fan girl over my own teammate… She said that she was really impressed with how I played today (I was on the field for about 5 kickoffs) and that she is forced to pay attention to me on the scout team as free safety and to keep up my hard work. I about died. I felt so proud and honored that she noticed me and how hard I had been working. I hope all of you have felt this or feel this at some point in your life. I am no Allison Cahill that’s for damn sure but I hope to help every single one of my teammates feel as proud of themselves and their milestones on the football field as I felt that day.
Kristianna Heaward
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: I have previously been a Captain for the Maine Mayhem for 3 season. I was captain of my high school soccer, softball and basketball team. Within my work environments I have held leadership positions such as, Lead Ophthalmic technician, Head of Medical billing, lead teacher at a preschool, and Current front office manager. I also held a seat on the Maine Mayhem Board for 2 years.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: In 2017 the Maine Mayhem made it to the IWFL and made the long trip to OHIO! Myself along with 3 of my teammates were the first to arrive so after getting the car for the four of us and driving from Columbus to the town our hotel was at we decided to grab a bite to eat before checking in. Well checking in was a COMPLETE nightmare the hotel was a NIGHTMARE but we wont get into that now we will save that story for another time. ANYWAYS we went back to the place we had lunch, I called Kate and Alicia said we can NOT stay here they were busy traveling to Ohio so I had to deal with the situation. I got us hooked up with a new hotel with like 15 rooms for a good price and called the place we booked the hotel at originally and spoke to management to get a full refund on our original room reservations. Informed the team of the new address and everyone was redirected. It could have turned into a really bad nightmare but I kept myself composed and handled it for my team. And though the memories and story will always be with me I hope I never have to see what I saw again! 😀
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: In all leadership positions I have held people have felt comfortable coming to me when they have problems that need to be heard and worked out. They have always felt comfortable knowing there is zero judgement with me and that makes it easy to be open and honest, feeling as though I hear what they are saying. Not only listening but working to resolve the issue. In leadership I think it is SUPER important to always remember you are an equal just because you wear the title doesn’t make you better than anyone else, you still have to respect other people. I find that one of my best qualities as a leader is that I remain humble and don’t see myself as higher ranked or better than anyone, I show my teammates the same respect I show my Coaches, I am a great teacher with a high level of patience, which in turn is very helpful for people to come to me with any issues or questions on and off the field.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: One quality I would say I need to improve on is being more vocal during pregame. I have so much to say and I stumble on my words sometimes. As the years have progressed I have gotten better and I am better at laying it out there but there is always room for improvement.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I have a positive attitude and I am a HUGE team player. I’m a pusher and will always push my teammates to be their best not only for the team but in their personal lives too! I will work closely with Coach Oja and remain on the same page with him, voice any concerns that my teammates might have (such as I have in the past seasons). We all have the same goal and that’s to bring home the title this year! One team one heart!
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: Yes, the Mayhem for 3 years as well in high school for soccer, softball and basketball
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: When I graduated from high school I was originally asked to join the Maine Rebels but at the time it just wasn’t a good fit. Years later after I had my daughter I was contacted AGAIN to play. I decided what the hell, I’d give it a shot and I never left, that is now 8 seasons ago. I was looking to be apart of something bigger than myself and I found it. The mayhem has become family and family is HUGE to me. As a leader of this team I give you my word to be there, listen, help push you to your limits in a positive way. Share my love and knowledge for the game with my teammates. I’ve been fortunate enough to have made many trips to Championship/All American weekends for IWFL/WFA and along the way I have been able to meet and interact with team owners, coaches, captains and other leaders. My love, passion and knowledge for this game is something that has grown over the past 8 years, I’ve sat out for injuries, I’ve sat out for pregnancy, I’ve attended All American weekends as a 2nd team player, I’ve sat and I’ve cheered from the side. I am not only a supporter on the field but off the field too.
Alicia Jeffords
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: I have been a captain of the Maine Mayhem, Maine Rebels and All American team. I also have acted as president for the Maine Women’s football Inc. and Maine Mayhem women’s football team since its inception.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: There was a time that the football team I was on was sold and moved to NH. I wanted to continue to have women’s football in Maine so I got together a group of players and coaches and started a new team. The result was amazing 😉
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: My best leadership quality is getting things done. Where there is a will there is a way. No matter what the task I find a way to get it done and done well.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: I would say that the leadership quality I need to work on is taking on too much and not asking for help. I am already working on this by handing some of my workload to others and working with them on getting those tasks done.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I feel I can positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem by leading by example. I will do this by working hard on and off the field. My commitment to this team is a huge priority. I plan on bringing a next level work ethic to every practice, workout, fundraiser and game.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: I have been a captain for the Maine Mayhem and Maine Rebels for a combination of over 10 seasons. I have also been Captain of the WFA All American team for 2 seasons.
Some of my biggest contributions are to ensure that new players and rookies have every opportunity to learn the game. I have studied with many players one on one or in groups to get them up to speed on anything football. I like to make myself available to anyone on my team for anything, whether it be to get extra practice time in or to just listening to a problem and giving advise.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: I started playing football when I was 25. I was going through a rough separation from my kids father and needed an outlet. That was 16 seasons ago.
My positive experience is having a coach that believes in me and makes me want to work harder than I ever have before. This coach leads by example and his work ethic is amazing. His encouragement drives me to accomplish anything.
Beverlee Russell
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: Mayhem Captain past 2 seasons
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: Honestly I never saw myself as a leader and have been placed into leadership by peers in professional and recreational settings several times. The military demanded leadership while conducting flight operations on board an aircraft carrier. Ensuring the safety of myself and those around me. Leadership through example and modeling behaviors expected. Being a clear example of what the expectation was resulted in no loss of life or medical emergencies in the Persian gulf.
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: My best leadership quality is enthusiasm. I feel I bring a fire and energy that stems from my passion of being on the field with my teammates.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: I will be working on my ability to put my emotions in check for the betterment of the team. No excuse for losing it on the field and the entire team being penalized.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: Being a reliable teammate who is dedicated to being on time to practices and other team events. Emulating what is expected of each teammate.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: 2x captain – Maine Mayhem
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: I initially learned of women’s football at 18 right before leaving for military service. I began playing at 24 after I moved to the Midwest in Kansas City. My 10th season will be the 2020 season. The most positive leadership I have encountered in my sports career has been the current Mayhem coaching staff. Gone are the days of scumbags utilizing a women’s team for dating purposes and hookups. Encountering several coaches who conducted themselves in this manner has made me step away from the game a few times. It is a breath of fresh air and extremely motivating to know that our current coaches are here with the same level of competitive nature and will to win of the players that are suiting up. This gives me the motivation to fight to win not only for myself and the women next to me but the coaches who have the same goals and expectations as the team.
Kaitlin Silva
Q: What, if any leadership positions have you previously held?
A: Yes, I have lead a company section in the military. That gave me the knowledge to understand different peoples personalities and attributes. Also working as a medical professional I have had to step up and make hard calls.
Q: Give an example of a time you had to take charge of a situation. How did you conduct yourself? What was the result?
A: When deployed I had to make many tough calls because it could be life or death of my men and women that were under me. I have had to know that sometimes the best outcome for your “team” may not be great for you. But if your team succeeds than you succeed as well and that’s the goal. The mission first…
Q: What do you feel is your best leadership quality?
A: I feel like I have two great leadership qualities. The first is that I love to teach and coach and pass on knowledge to help someone out. It’s better to coach than to yell and freak out. My other quality would be that, I don’t judge anyone from their past or mistakes they have made. I have been through a lot and I wouldn’t want anyone to judge me so why should I judge anyone else. You would be surprised what you can learn from someone.
Q: What is the leadership quality that you feel you need to improve on? How do you plan on making improvements?
A: I know that I have had some issues with my temper before. After talking with Katie McFadden and Alicia we have worked on it. I am my biggest critic and so I become very frustrated and hot headed when things don’t go my way. Now that I have been given more responsibilities within the team, I know how easily they can be taken away.
Q: How can you positively contribute to the Maine Mayhem if selected as Captain?
A: I am a firm believe of team moral and making sure everyone is included. We are team and it should be one team one fight moral. And I know in the past I have felt left out and don’t want anyone, rookies and vets included to feel like they are a part of an amazing team.
Q: Have you ever been a Captain for any team before? If so, how do you think you contributed to the team?
A: Yes. I was captain of my high school softball team, and navy softball team. I think I was a strong supportiveleader, regardless of if you were the MVP or under dog.
Q: Briefly describe how you got into women’s football, how long you have been playing, and share one positive interaction you have had with a leader in sports and how that interaction may contribute to your role as a leader on the Mayhem.
A: Last year was my first season playing football and believe me it was a whirlwind of ups and downs. I think that if I had to pin point a leader on our team that affected me would be Coach Wayne. Last season was hard for me in the sense that I could not hear. I had Becca a lot to translate a lot of what was going on. But as a coach he took time to understand that I couldn’t hear what was going on and would slow things down so I would understand. He would pull me aside and mouth what was going on. That’s the kind of leader I aspire to be.

 

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